nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

As Ebola Cases Spike, WHO Asks For More Money And Help
The world’s largest Ebola outbreak continues to surge at a troubling rate. The number of cases has climbed by nearly 20 percent in the past week, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.
At least 759 people have caught the hemorrhagic fever and 467 of those have died in three West African countries since March.
The WHO has been so concerned about the disease spreading to other countries that the agency held an emergency meeting this week in Accra, Ghana.
To contain this “unprecedented outbreak,” the agency said Thursday, it needs more people on the ground to find cases, and to track down the family, friends, co-workers and other contacts of these infected patients. The agency called for more money and better communication among the countries involved.
The WHO is also setting up an Ebola control center in Guinea to coordinate the effort.
As NPR’s Jason Beaubian explained Thursday on All Things Considered, while the outbreak shows signs of slowing down in Guinea, it continues to expand in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Ebola cases have appeared in more than 60 cities and villages, some far-flung — up to 400 miles apart. That’s about the distance between Boston and Baltimore.
So why has this outbreak been so hard to contain? Many factors have come together to create the crisis.
Continue reading.
Chart: The 2014 outbreak is the largest on record. Values are as of July 1. (Data from WHO/Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

As Ebola Cases Spike, WHO Asks For More Money And Help

The world’s largest Ebola outbreak continues to surge at a troubling rate. The number of cases has climbed by nearly 20 percent in the past week, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.

At least 759 people have caught the hemorrhagic fever and 467 of those have died in three West African countries since March.

The WHO has been so concerned about the disease spreading to other countries that the agency held an emergency meeting this week in Accra, Ghana.

To contain this “unprecedented outbreak,” the agency said Thursday, it needs more people on the ground to find cases, and to track down the family, friends, co-workers and other contacts of these infected patients. The agency called for more money and better communication among the countries involved.

The WHO is also setting up an Ebola control center in Guinea to coordinate the effort.

As NPR’s Jason Beaubian explained Thursday on All Things Considered, while the outbreak shows signs of slowing down in Guinea, it continues to expand in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Ebola cases have appeared in more than 60 cities and villages, some far-flung — up to 400 miles apart. That’s about the distance between Boston and Baltimore.

So why has this outbreak been so hard to contain? Many factors have come together to create the crisis.

Continue reading.

Chart: The 2014 outbreak is the largest on record. Values are as of July 1. (Data from WHO/Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR)

jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

scishow:

i-heart-histo:

Once upon a slide…the first microbiology book for 5 year olds!

At last! No more bed time fairy tales about damsels in distress, princesses in pink and knights in white shining armor.

Move over Disney. This is a world we should be opening our kids up to. Steeped in reality. A world 1000x more exciting than those lands too far far far away, and it is all playing out under our very noses, inside our refrigerators, outside our back doors and throughout our own bodies.

Thank you to Nicola Davies (author) and Emily Sutton (illustrator) for this beautiful non-fiction children’s book that introduces young readers to microscopy.

I can’t wait to buy this for my nieces.

Let me know if you need help with the histological sequel ;)

i-heart-histo

Sources:

View more of Emily’s beautiful artwork at her website

Find out more about award winning author Nicola at her blog/website

Images and book (ISBN:1406341045) seen at amazon.com and via Walker Books 

We are SO down with this.

Where was this book when I was a kid?