currentsinbiology
currentsinbiology:

'Artificial spleen' removes poisons from blood
Sepsis is the body’s over-the-top reaction to an infection. Even with modern medical care, it can result in organ failure and death within just a few hours. Measures such as early treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics—which slay many different kinds of bacteria—have reduced mortality in recent years, but no drugs specifically target sepsis. Cell biologist and bioengineer Donald Ingber of Harvard University and colleagues wanted to test a different therapy—a technique to pull microbes and the toxins they release from the blood. As their design guide, the researchers looked to the spleen; the organ filters out pathogens and poisons as blood wends through its narrow passages.
Magnetic beads trap a bacterium (blue) and allow a new device to filter it from the blood. Harvard Wyss Institute

currentsinbiology:

'Artificial spleen' removes poisons from blood

Sepsis is the body’s over-the-top reaction to an infection. Even with modern medical care, it can result in organ failure and death within just a few hours. Measures such as early treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics—which slay many different kinds of bacteria—have reduced mortality in recent years, but no drugs specifically target sepsis. Cell biologist and bioengineer Donald Ingber of Harvard University and colleagues wanted to test a different therapy—a technique to pull microbes and the toxins they release from the blood. As their design guide, the researchers looked to the spleen; the organ filters out pathogens and poisons as blood wends through its narrow passages.

Magnetic beads trap a bacterium (blue) and allow a new device to filter it from the blood. Harvard Wyss Institute

nprglobalhealth
nprglobalhealth:

The World Health Organization is hoping to raise $600 million from donor countries to fight the outbreak in West Africa. But  Dr. Margaret Chan, the director-general of the WHO, tells NPR’s David Greene that aid groups need more than just money. They need what Chan calls medical “troops” and “weapons.”
Read more: How Do We Stop Ebola? WHO Declares War On The Virus

nprglobalhealth:

The World Health Organization is hoping to raise $600 million from donor countries to fight the outbreak in West Africa. But  Dr. Margaret Chan, the director-general of the WHO, tells NPR’s David Greene that aid groups need more than just money. They need what Chan calls medical “troops” and “weapons.”

Read more: How Do We Stop Ebola? WHO Declares War On The Virus